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Friday, February 3, 2012

Jacket - The Inside Story

As promised here are some photos showing the work on the inside of the jacket.  The Singer tailoring book I referred to is really well written, with 3 different options for tailoring a jacket;

  • Custom tailoring (lots of hand padstitching etc.)
  • Machine tailoring (using a machine to do padstitching)
  • Speed (or fusible) tailoring (using fusible interfacings)
I'm sure it will come as no surprise that I used the method with the word "speed" in it!  In addition to the book and DVD I already mentioned in my last post some other great resources are;

Sewing tutorials site (a collection of tutorials from various bloggers helpfully put in one place by Sigrid)

Here is the front (fully fused) and side front (partially fused) with the fused chest piece below the shoulder.  I think next time I would fuse the whole side piece and make the chest piece a bit larger, particularly with the weight of this fabric & the pocket I just think both these areas could do with a bit more support.  

The back piece, upper back is interfaced and fusible bias stay tape applied to the neck and armscyes. 

Bound buttonhole (on the left) and the window in the front facing.

Inside view of the above, I used a bias piece of lining on the buttonhole window, organza would be better but lining works.  (There are some great tutorials for bound buttonholes in the sewing tutorials link above if you don't have the Singer Tailoring book).

Here is the whole inside jacket before the lining went in.  I finished the pockets and the collar before sewing the side seams and then setting in the sleeves - it is much easier to work in the flat and also you can fine tune the fit.  This jacket also had back darts and I left those pinned until I was ready to finish the side seams too for the same fitting reasons.


 Here is a closer look at the shoulder and sleeve.  Instead of a sleeve head I bind the top of the armscye with a strip of fleece, it serves the same purpose (I think) and gives a nice rounded finish.  I'm not sure if this is a standard method, it's something I picked up from the English Couture Company course and DVD.  At this stage the shoulder pad was just tacked at the shoulder seam, but I also tacked it about 2/3 of the way down each side.

I don't have photos, but the hem was also fused from the bottom of the jacket to just above the finished hem, which was handstitched, as were the sleeve hems.

I separately assembled the lining and then machined it to the front and back facings.  I then finished attaching it at the hems (jacket and sleeves) by hand, I never enjoy this part but I find I have a lot more control than when I try to do a fully bagged lining by machine.  Something to work on next time!


21 comments:

Sew-4-Fun said...

Thanks for all the inside photos. I love seeing the inside of other people's creations. Your wonderful workmanship on the inside shows on the outside. Nice job.

Lena Merrin said...

Cool! Loved the armscye binding tip - It will give the seam allowances a nice neat look and will support the sleeve head nicely. Do you put stays in sleeve heads? I insert calico stays in sleeve heads and top of the back/neckline/armscye area. It gives instant support and drapes really well too

sewing spots said...

I loved your posts about your jacket. It was so helpful for you to post the inner workings, too! Beautiful!

Julie said...

Thanks for sharing your resources. I know I'll use them soon. Your jacket is lovely.

Lori said...

Thanks for all the inside photos and information.

Irene said...

Wonderful job!

Lisa said...

I love , love , love seeeing these inside photos. I learn alot from them. Beautfiul work Allison.

Karin said...

Oooooh, I love a nosy look inside! It's a lot of work, but your jacket does look marvellous.

Mrs L said...

Thank you for posting these, I think it's great to see the inside shots as they are so informative. I hope you are proud of the result - your jacket looks fantastic!

Susan said...

Your jacket has all the elements that I learned in my tailored jackets class. Too bad I have yet to try out the techniques.

Cennetta said...

Thank you for showing the inside of your beautifully tailored jacket.

Catherine Daze said...

That looks like a lot of work! The end results are great though.

coffeeaddict said...

I usually jump right to the fast version too :-)
I read a very useful article on an Armani technique; sadly don't remeber where...
they use fusuble interface as well and manipulate it to create the lapel roll by using a round ironing surface. I tried that with my first lightweigt jacket and it worked out wonderful.

Sophia said...

Thanks for showing the inside of the jacket. This is so interesting and there's so much to learn from the pictures alone.

Beth (SunnyGal Studio) said...

Very interesting to see how someone else does a tailored jacket, I am just about finished with mine. Tailoring takes so many hours (as compared to a quick dress) but I always tell myself that will get lots of wear from a wardrobe staple like a jacket - so that is consolation during all that stitching and pressing :)

Amy said...

Your jacket is gorgeous. I also love seeing the insides. This is lovely work. I like the speed versions, too... I did Sherry's original sew-along and highly recommend it.

Gail said...

Thanks for revealing the 'innards' of your jacket. Could you provide a bit more detail about the treatment of the armhole seam.

The Slapdash Sewist said...

The guts of what goes into a jacket are quite amazing! Despite your profession of "speed," this is quite impressive. Love the final jacket--classic and wearable forever.

a little sewing said...

wow, thanks for showing how you constructed your jacket. Impressive work!

melissa said...

I'm such a geek but I love the interior shots! I've not heard of using fleece to round out a shoulder before, so thanks for that!

Monika Magdalena said...

Elegant jacket, super looks and sewn perfectly